Why I am now a Sabbatarian, part 1

A couple years ago I wrote a series of posts called “It is a sin to not gather on the Lord’s Day.” I have not changed my view on that. But I have changed how I get there biblically. In that series I started off by saying I was not a Sabbatarian. Then about a year ago, I became 50/50 on the issue. Now, though I may always have the attitude of “I could be wrong here,” I am now a Sabbatarian.

I think this is a good thing for me to write about because most of my close theological friends are not Sabbatarians. I graduated from Southern Seminary in 2008, and most (if not all) of my professors are not Sabbatarians– guys like Bruce Ware, Tom Schreiner, Steve Wellum, and Don Whitney. Heck, I have heard Al Mohler is not a Sabbatarian.

Virtual mentors of mine like Mark Dever and Jonathan Leeman are not Sabbatarians. My elders at my old church are pretty much all not Sabbatarians as far as I know, including Ryan Fullerton, my favorite preacher in the world. Am I crazy?

My aim in this series is to challenge all of my closest friends to re-think this issue and to challenge current Sabbatarians to think more deeply about application. One of my biggest obstacles to becoming Sabbatarian was that I looked more Sabbatarian in practice than a lot of Sabbatarians I knew personally.

So let me begin with a definition by grabbing from what I said as a non-Sabbatarian a couple years ago:

First, I am not a Sabbatarian, meaning I do not believe the Sabbath Law from the Old Covenant carries over into the New Covenant. If I were, then I would simply say the Fourth Commandment is where God commands us to gather on one day out of the week for worship, and that we can infer from the early church and from the resurrection that the Sabbath has moved from Saturday to Sunday. But as I said, I am not a Sabbatarian.”

Hopefully in obedience to God, today I am a Sabbatarian, meaning I do believe the Sabbath Law from the Old Covenant carries over into the New Covenant. Therefore, I would say the Fourth Commandment is where God commands us to gather on one day out of the week for worship, and we can infer from the early church and from the resurrection that the Sabbath has moved from Saturday to Sunday.

I used to object, “but we are not under the Law of Moses! We are under the Law of Christ!” Obviously, that held a lot of weight for me for a long time. So let’s think about that a little next post.

 

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2 responses to “Why I am now a Sabbatarian, part 1

  1. Early Church writings show the disciples of the Apostles understood that keeping the Sabbath was optional not binding to someone who is in Christ. They also gathered on the Lord’s Day (8th day of the week according to the Roman calendar of that age) Or known under the Gregorian calendar Sunday.
    Feel free to keep Sabbath there is nothing wrong with it! But do not make it a salvation issue because they you are fallen from grace as Paul said in Galatians. There is a Sabbath rest for the new covenant and you can see it in Hebrews chapter 3 and 4

    • Thanks for writing. Can you name a couple early church writings that would be good to read?

      Not sure what you mean by “feel free to keep the Sabbath”- try read second to last paragraph

      And what do you mean by “salvation issue”? It’s not any more or less a “salvation issue” than any of the other 10 Commandments, right? If you mean “gospel” issue (like 1st order doctrine issue), what in this post gave you that impression that I was doing that?

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