The problem with Barronelle Stutzman

She’s a godly woman. This is her story:

But there is a problem. (And I mean no disrespect to Ms. Stutzman. She’s a godly woman. I just think we ALL can learn how to be more faithful witnesses in this world, even learn from the unintentional errors of others.)

In a later interview she was asked if she had a problem with homosexuality, and she said ‘no.’ Of course, what she meant is that she will love people no matter what. Praise God!

But here is the problem with her answer as I understand her situation: She was very Christ-like toward her friends who practice homosexuality for about 10 years, and the moment they asked her to make flowers for their so-called wedding, she was also Christ-like in refusing to celebrate a sinful practice with them, BUT, their reaction was all likely made worse by the fact that she did not give them a clear enough vibe for those 10 years that she had a problem with their sin (let me be clear there is a ton more wrong done to her than she did wrong; I am just trying to learn from this how to be a better evangelist).

We all understand her struggle. None of us want to single out any one sin. None of us want to be hated by our friends. We understand. I understand. She will be blessed for her obedience to Christ.

But, all our non-Christian friends, as well as our Christian brothers and sisters, should know that we have a problem with their sin. We should have a problem with their sin, and with our own sin. Because God has a problem with our sin. The wrath of God comes because of these very things! Christ was slain because of sin!

What kind of “friend” are we being if we can “love” for 10 years, and not call someone to repentance? It is not enough to tell people that we are Christians. That is a good step toward evangelism, no doubt. But with all the confusion about what is and is not a Christian anymore, and with all the disagreements about what Christians believe, maybe one of the best things we can say nowadays (and one of the best ways to get an evangelistic conversation going), if anyone asks us “do you have a problem with homosexuality?” we should say, “of course I do.”

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