Monthly Archives: April 2016

Give me Sunday-only Christians any day!

No one wants Christians who only act like Christians on Sundays but live however they want the rest of the week. I hope we agree there. But what if we had to choose between a Christian who only showed up on Sundays for worship (but could not gather with believers the rest of the week) and a Christian who rarely showed up on Sundays (but was in all the small group meetings and prayer groups and bible studies and accountability groups)? Hopefully we never have to choose (but I’m obviously trying to make a point). Which would you prefer?

Give me the Sunday-only Christian any day! Suppose you are really busy. Suppose you are one who wishes they could be more involved in church activities. And you feel guilty that you are not more involved than you are. If you are guarding the Lord’s Day gathering on Sundays as a weekly staple in your life, do not let the devil make you sell yourself too short:

  • you are being fed the preached Word of God every week, which means you are encountering the Living God each Sunday
  • you are with your family of believers the one time each week when everyone is actually scheduled to be together
  • any unbeliever could walk into your worship service and see the visible Body of Christ together, and be drawn in by your love for each other
  • you are likely seeing every baptism the church ever observes
  • you are likely partaking of the Lord’s Supper every time it is offered
  • you are participating in a worship gathering that points to Heaven like no other event during the week can
  • in a healthy church you are guaranteed to hear the gospel of Jesus Christ proclaimed, which will help you persevere this next week (1 Corinthians 15.1-2)

Imagine how much more you are receiving from God in all this than the person who gives more quantity of time but misses the Lord’s Day gathering regularly. You might not be with the church as much as you want, but a steady diet of Lord’s Day worship with the church will help you be the church throughout the week.

The evil of the category of “mental illness”

I have many reasons why I generally disagree with the category of mental illness. I will just share one: it is a horror that people would put other people into some “lesser” category. Two examples of how you might unwittingly do this:

  1. Suppose someone says they suffer from “post-traumatic stress disorder.” You have heard of others who have struggled with that. You have seen the harmful effects of it. You have never suffered the kind of trauma they have experienced. So instead of seeing them as a fellow sinner made in God’s image, in need of God’s grace just like you, and instead of moving into their life to know them and love them and try to understand their experiences, you decide you are not gifted enough to minister to them. So you never really get to know them the way you might with someone who has no “label.” Or at the very least, you will wait to get to know them until they are “cured.”
  2. Suppose you know someone with Down Syndrome. You have internal compassion for them and their family, but you figure you can never have a regular conversation with that person. So you don’t even try. Maybe they visit your church, but you don’t even introduce yourself–maybe even unwittingly you ignore them because “regular” people have more to offer the church, more money to give, more ways they can serve. So instead of seeing them as a fellow sinner made in God’s image, in need of God’s grace just like you, and instead of moving into their life to know them and love them and try to understand their experiences, you decide you are not gifted enough to minister to them. They have “special needs” that you could never meet.

I pray the Lord help us see same-ness before we ever see differences. Every single human being has the exact same level of need for the gospel.